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An Investigation of the Information Literacy Instruction Practices, Attitudes, and Knowledge of University Faculty: Results of a Web-based Survey at York University, Canada

Forgive me for the sparsity of postings recently. Busy times, what can I say. But expect to see more here in the months to come.

I gave a presentation at Sheffield University recently. I approached Sheila Webber, an information literacy scholar I admire hugely, and whose blog I follow regularly, about visiting the Department of Information Studies at the University. I was interested to learn about information literacy research at the Department, especially relating to faculty and information literacy. Sheila also showed me the Information Commons at the University, which impressed me. And I had the privilege to sit in on one of her classes.

Sheila invited me to give a talk on my research during my visit, which I gladly did. The title and abstract appear below and to download the slides and audio just follow the link to relevant files on YorkSpace, York University’s institutional repository, provided at the bottom of this post.

This presentation was given on October 27, 2009 and was a Centre of Information Literacy Research event. It was attended by a mix of faculty and graduate students in the Department of Information Studies, Sheffield University and professional librarians. I plan to engage in a second phase of this research after Christmas, which will involve conducting interviews with faculty at York University. I’m very interested in hearing form any other librarians or scholars engaged in similar research.

Talk Title: An Investigation of the Information Literacy Instruction Practices, Attitudes, and Knowledge of University Faculty: Results of a Web-based Survey at York University, Canada.

Abstract: This presentation provides an overview of key findings and recommendations of a survey of full-time faculty at York University, which investigated their information literacy instruction practices, attitudes, and knowledge. The session examines the extent to which the findings of this study either corroborate or differ from results of similar studies uncovered by a recent review of the LIS literature. Findings regarding faculty perceptions of the importance of information literacy instruction, and of information literacy competency levels among students are discussed. Data regarding levels of faculty engagement in teaching information literacy competencies, either by themselves or in collaboration with a librarian, are also shared. Findings are also highlighted regarding the nature of information literacy instruction typically incorporated within the classroom by faculty, as well as their general experiences and estimation of it. Results regarding faculty awareness of, and support for different formats and methods of instruction delivery are summarised. Based on these survey results, the researcher’s summary of implications for practice and research are shared.

Link to slides and audio file in YorkSpace.

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